Q&A: Home Equity Lines of Credit

Dear Liz: We have taken several withdrawals from our home equity line of credit. Now the balance is close to $100,000. It's the interest-only type. We don't know how to pay off this amount systematically. Can you help?

Answer: As you've discovered, it's not a good idea to pledge your home as collateral when you don't know how you'll pay off the debt. Home equity lines of credit can be an inexpensive way to borrow initially, but the interest-only period doesn't last forever and eventually your payments will get a lot more expensive.

Many homeowners who tapped their equity before the financial crisis are discovering this fact—and some risk losing their homes. The initial "draw" period where you pay only interest typically lasts 10 years. After that, you can't make further withdrawals and you're expected to pay both interest and principal over the next 20 years. Your payments may jump 50% or more, depending on prevailing interest rates.

A better way to use HELOCs is for short-term borrowing that's paid off well before the draw period expires. If you can increase your current payments to do that, you should.

If you can't make pay more than your minimum, though, you'll need to explore other alternatives. You may be able to arrange a cash-out refinance that combines the HELOC balance with your current mortgage and gives you 30 years to pay it off. If not, you can make an appointment with a housing counselor (you can get referrals at www.hud.gov) to see what options may be available to you as a distressed borrower. If you can't restructure the debt, a short sale or a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure may be a better option than letting the lender take your home.

Powered by FoolProof

eUpdates

Online Financial Education