Q&A: Big Gifts

Dear Liz: My brother-in-law won a good chunk of money playing the lottery. He is waiting for the check to come any day now. He is willing to give me $2 million. The question for you is how I can maximize that amount of money short term or long term?

Answer: If your brother-in-law has any sense at all, he'll realize he shouldn't have promised any gifts before he assembled a team of professional advisors. And they almost certainly will have a dim view of him giving you a seven-figure sum.

Handouts that large have gift tax consequences. Anything over the annual exemption amount, which this year is $14,000 per recipient, has to be reported on a gift tax return. Amounts over $14,000 count against his lifetime exemption limit, which is $5.45 million this year. Once that limit is exceeded, he'll owe substantial tax on any gifts.

Also, the $5.45-million limit is for gift and estate taxes combined. Any part of the exemption he uses during his lifetime for gifts won't be available to shield his estate from estate taxes when he dies. Although, given his apparent generosity, he may not have enough left at his death to trigger an estate tax.

It's not uncommon for those who receive large windfalls to wind up broke, especially if the amount is much larger than they're used to handling. More than a few professional athletes and lottery winners have wound up in bankruptcy court. They spend or give away money at a clip that simply isn't sustainable.

Which may be the road down which your brother-in-law has started. You can take advantage of your relative's ignorance by holding him to his pledge or you can do the right thing, which is to encourage him to hire fee-only advisors—including a CPA, an estate-planning attorney and a comprehensive financial planner who's willing to sign a fiduciary oath—to help him deal with this windfall.

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